Doctoral studies

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university type - Italy  
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Milano, Italy

Electrical Engineering

Language: English Studies in English
Subject area: engineering and engineering trades
University website: www.polimi.it
Electrical Engineering
Electrical engineering is a professional engineering discipline that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electromagnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broadcasting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.
Engineering
Engineering is the creative application of science, mathematical methods, and empirical evidence to the innovation, design, construction, operation and maintenance of structures, machines, materials, devices, systems, processes, and organizations. The discipline of engineering encompasses a broad range of more specialized fields of engineering, each with a more specific emphasis on particular areas of applied mathematics, applied science, and types of application. See glossary of engineering.
Engineering
Engineering is the conscious application of science to the problem of economic production.
Halbert Powers Gillette (1910). cited in: T.J. Hoover & J.C. Lounsbury Fish. The Engineering Profession. Stanford University Press, 1941. p. 463
Engineering
Engineering is the art of directing the great sources of power in nature for the use and convenience of man.
Thomas Tredgold (1828), used in the Royal Charter of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) published in: The Times, London, article CS102127326, 30 June 1828.
Engineering
Engineering is too important to wait for science.
Benoît Mandelbrot As quoted in "Fractal Finance" by Greg Phelan in Yale Economic Review (Fall 2005)
Shallow lakes have been greatly affected by increased concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus from intensive agriculture and increased human populations. These key nutrients for plant growth enter the aquatic environment, changing clear water to turbid through a phenomenon called eutrophication.

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