Gdańsk, Poland

Art history/Ästhetics

Nauki o sztuce

Language: Polish Studies in Polish
Subject area: arts
University website: en.ug.edu.pl
Art
Art is a diverse range of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts (artworks), expressing the author's imaginative or technical skill, intended to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power. In their most general form these activities include the production of works of art, the criticism of art, the study of the history of art, and the aesthetic dissemination of art.
Art History
Art history is the study of objects of art in their historical development and stylistic contexts; that is genre, design, format, and style. The study includes painting, sculpture, architecture, ceramics, furniture, and other decorative objects.
History
History (from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation") is the study of the past as it is described in written documents. Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events. Scholars who write about history are called historians.
History
The greater part of what passes for diplomatic history is little more than the record of what one clerk said to another clerk.
G. M. Young, Victorian England: Portrait of an Age (1936)
History
Man is a history-making creature who can neither repeat his past nor leave it behind.
W. H. Auden, The Dyers Hand, "D.H. Lawrence" (1962)
Art
I am willing to let it rest on the determination of every reader, whether the pleasure which he has received from these effects of calm and luminous distance be not the most singular and memorable of which he has been conscious... It is not then by nobler form, it is not by positiveness of hue, it is not by intensity of light... that this strange distant space possesses its attractive power. But there is one thing that it has, or suggests, which no other object of sight suggests in equal degree, and that is—Infinity. ...No work of any art, in which this expression of infinity is possible, can be perfect or supremely elevated, without it.
John Ruskin, Modern Painters (1860) Vol. 2, Ch. V
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